‘Leopard print’ vans to be rolled out in Ireland tomorrow

Digg, the Google-owned search engine, is expected to roll out the first of its new Leopard print vans in the Republic of Ireland.

The Leopard print van is a concept that combines two main components: a print engine and a print printer.

Digg uses the print engine to print the website content on the screen, while the printer produces a black and white version of the site on the print-ready part.

The first batch of Leopard print-outs will be rolled-out tomorrow at the start of Digg’s ‘New Year in Ireland’ programme.

It is part of the company’s annual ‘New Ireland’ campaign.

Leopard prints will also be available at its headquarters in San Francisco, California.

This year’s New Year in Dublin marks the 75th anniversary of the founding of the Irish National Archives, with an exhibition entitled ‘Dying to Dig: The Making of the Archives of Ireland’ in the National Archives building.

The new print-on-demand service will make it easier for Irish users to get a high-quality digital copy of their digital content, while also allowing for easy access to other digital content.

The programme will also see Digg roll out a new ‘Leopards’ programme, which is intended to highlight the achievements of Irish people working on the digital front.

Diggs aims to encourage and empower Irish digital talent through its Leopard programme, while making it easier to access digital content in the digital age.

Online retail outlets like Amazon and B&m are also expected to begin offering digital products on a wide range of platforms, including the Digg platform.

Irish Digital Network (IDN) was created in 2014 to enable the internet and digital services to be shared and interoperated between Irish companies and their customers in a truly Irish way.

IDN’s aim is to build the digital economy of the future, and to build a culture of sharing, interoperability and innovation.

The Digg team will also explore ways to connect the Irish economy to the global digital economy by supporting local innovation and the growth of Irish startups.

For more information on Digg and its programme, visit the company website.